HISTOIRE

Histoire de l'acupuncture et de la MTC : la Chine

2011 vues 13/12/2008 14/11/2017 0

Traités et monographies

 


1
Wong K. Chimin [Wang Chi-min]; Wu Lien-teh. History of Chinese Medicine. Being a Chronicle of Medical Happenings in China from Ancient Times to the Present Period. Tientsin: Tientsin Press. 1932. 2d ed., Shanghai: National Quarantine Service, 1936. [gera:7259].

La médecine chinoise au cours des siècles. Paris: Editions Roger Dacosta; 1959. [gera:92237].
 
2
La médecine chinoise au cours des siècles. Huard P, Ming Wong. Paris: Editions Roger Dacosta; 1959. [gera:92237].

Exposition sur l
3
Pierre Huard, Jacqueline Sonolet et Ming Wong. Exposition sur l’histoire de la médecine en Extrême-Orient. 23-31 octobre 1959. Catalogue. Paris: Fondation Singer-Polignac; 1959. [gera:126542].

La médecine des chinois. Huard P, Ming Wong. Paris: Hachette; 1967.
4
La médecine des chinois. Huard P, Ming Wong. Paris: Hachette; 1967. [gera:3596].

5
Needham J. Clerks and crafts men in China and the West. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1970. [gera:7230].


6
Unschuld PU. Medical ethics in imperial China. Berkeley: University of California Press; 1979.141P. [gera:20866].

Celestial lancets. A history of acupuncture & moxa. Cambridge University Press. 1980.
7
Celestial lancets. A history of acupuncture & moxa. Lu  Gwei-Djen & Joseph Needham. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1980. [gera:21189].


8
The historical development of acupuncture. Chuang Yu-min. Los Angeles: Oriental Healing Arts Institute; 1982. [gera:7088].


9
Medicine in China. A history of ideas. Unschuld PU. Berkeley: University of California Press; 1985. The central theme of this work is expressed through three distinct elements that comprise the theoretical development and the practical growth of Chinese medicine. The first is « magical » correspondence. The second is empirical, practical medicine – the folk knowledge of herbs and substances that aided in the treatment of disease. The third is the professional knowledge of the pharmacist or acupuncturist, a medicine of systematic correspondences. Unschuld’s work teaches us that medicine is heavily influenced by the society in which it is practiced. The perspectives he offers, and the models he explains, help the reader to develop broad understanding of Chinese medicine and the recognize the antecedents for « modem » ideas. He provides a means by which we may recognize when we can or cannot call upon the long experience of Chinese medicine to validate our own adaptations. His translational and academic rigor allows the conceptual integrity of Chinese medicine to be preserved, thereby opening up to the reader a gateway to an understanding of a large and illustrious body of classical literature. [Redwing Reviews, June, 1995].

Abrégé de la médecine et de la pharmacologie chinoise. Beijing: Ediitons en langues Etrangères. 1986.
10
Abrégé de la médecine et de la pharmacologie chinoise. Fu Weikang. Beijing: Ediitons en langues Etrangères. 1986.  [gera: 28624].


11
Medicine in China, a history of pharmaceutics. Unschuld PU. Berkeley: University of California Press; 1986.  [gera:1902].
 

Histoire de la médecine chinoise. Hoisey D. Paris: Payot. 1988. [gera:27376].
 
12
Histoire de la médecine chinoise. Hoisey D. Paris: Payot. 1988. [gera:27376].

 

 

13
Wang Zhenguo, Chen Ping, Xie Peiping. History and development of traditional chinese medicine. Beijing: Science Press.1999.
This series is intended for students and practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This first volume describes the history and development of TCM in seven chapters covering the periods up to the 21st Century B. C., 2000-476 B. C., 475 B. C.-265 A. D., 265-960 A. D., 960-1368 A. D., 1368-1840 A. D. and 1840-1949 A. D. Each chapter begins with a brief account of the historical background with regard to politics, economics, culture, science and technology, and considers how they affected the development of TCM. Each chapter also has a summary at the end. A brief chronicle of events of the history of TCM is provided for reference.

Medicine in China. Historical artifacts and images. Munich: Prestel Verlag; 2000. [gera:74810].
14
Medicine in China. Historical artifacts and images. Munich: Prestel Verlag; 2000. [gera:74810].

Innovations in chinese medicine. Hsu E. Cambridge: cambridge University Press; 2001. 442P.
Contents
Introduction Elisabeth Hsu; Part I. Mai and Qi in the Western Han: 1. The influence of nurturing life culture on the development of Acumoxa therapy Vivienne Low; 2. Pulse diagnostics in the western Han: how mai and qi determine bing Elisabeth Hsu; Part II. Correlative Cosmologies: 3. Iatromancy, diagnosis, and prognosis in early Chinese medicine Donald Harper; 4. The system of the five circulatory phases and the six seasonal influences, a source of innovation in medicine under the Song (960–1279) Catherine Despeux; Part III. Dietetics and Pharmacotherapy: 5. Dietetics in Tang China: beginnings of a specialised materia dietetica Ute Engelhardt; 6. A Song innovation in pharmacotherapy: some remarks on ‘white arsenic’ and ‘flowers of arsenic’ Frederic Obringer; 7. The Bencao gangmu (classified materia medica) of Li Shizhen - an innovation for natural history? Georges Metailie and Elisabeth Hsu; 8. Robust northerners and delicate southerners: the nineteenth-century invention of a southern medical tradition Marta Hanson; Part V. Rise of the Genre of Medical Case Statements: 9. Yi’an (case statements) - the origins of a genre of Chinese medical literature Christopher Cullen; 10. From case-records to case-histories: the modernisation of a Chinese medical genre, 1912–49 Bridie J. Andrews; Part VI. Medical Rationale in the People’s Republic: 11 A new, scientific and unified medicine: civil war in China and the new Acumoxa, 1945–9 Kim Taylor; 12. Shaping Chinese medicine: two case studies from contemporary China Volker Scheid.
15
Innovations in chinese medicine. Hsu E. Cambridge: cambridge University Press; 2001. 442P. [gera:111154].
Contents Introduction Elisabeth Hsu; Part I. Mai and Qi in the Western Han: 1. The influence of nurturing life culture on the development of Acumoxa therapy Vivienne Low; 2. Pulse diagnostics in the western Han: how mai and qi determine bing Elisabeth Hsu; Part II. Correlative Cosmologies: 3. Iatromancy, diagnosis, and prognosis in early Chinese medicine Donald Harper; 4. The system of the five circulatory phases and the six seasonal influences, a source of innovation in medicine under the Song (960–1279) Catherine Despeux; Part III. Dietetics and Pharmacotherapy: 5. Dietetics in Tang China: beginnings of a specialised materia dietetica Ute Engelhardt; 6. A Song innovation in pharmacotherapy: some remarks on ‘white arsenic’ and ‘flowers of arsenic’ Frederic Obringer; 7. The Bencao gangmu (classified materia medica) of Li Shizhen – an innovation for natural history? Georges Metailie and Elisabeth Hsu; 8. Robust northerners and delicate southerners: the nineteenth-century invention of a southern medical tradition Marta Hanson; Part V. Rise of the Genre of Medical Case Statements: 9. Yi’an (case statements) – the origins of a genre of Chinese medical literature Christopher Cullen; 10. From case-records to case-histories: the modernisation of a Chinese medical genre, 1912–49 Bridie J. Andrews; Part VI. Medical Rationale in the People’s Republic: 11 A new, scientific and unified medicine: civil war in China and the new Acumoxa, 1945–9 Kim Taylor; 12. Shaping Chinese medicine: two case studies from contemporary China Volker Scheid.

Médecines chinoises. Catalogue de l
16
Médecines chinoises. Catalogue de l’exposition du Parc de la Villette, Paris-18 avril-8 juillet 2001. Unschuld PU. Montpellier: Indigène Edition; 2001.


17
Goldschmidt A.The evolution of chinese medicine: song dynasty, 960-1200. London: Routledge. 2008. The history of Chinese medicine hinges on three major turning points: the formation of canonical theory in the Han dynasty; the transformation of medicine via the integration of earlier medical theories and practices in the Song dynasty; and the impact of Western medicine from the nineteenth century onwards. This book offers a comprehensive overview of the crucial second stage in the evolution of Chinese medicine by examining the changes in Chinese medicine during the pivotal era of the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127). Scholars often characterize the Northern Song era as a time of change in every aspect of political, social, intellectual or economic life. More specifically it focuses on three narratives of change: the emperor’s interest in medicine elevated the status of medicine in the eyes of the elite, leading to an increased involvement of intellectuals and the literary elite in medicine ; government officials systematically revised, printed, and promulgated earlier heterogeneous medical manuscripts belonging to various traditions ; the government established unique imperially sponsored medical institutions to handle public health and other aspects of medicine. As the first book to study the transformation medicine underwent during the Northern Song period this volume will appeal to Sinologists and scholars of the history of medicine alike