L’ESTOMAC


 


According to the ancients…the stomach has the pen-men (cardiac orifice) above and the yen-men (pylorus) below ..
[Wang Qingren (1768-1831), Yi Lin Gai Cuo (Correction des erreurs médicales, 1830), traduction John Dudgeon (1893)].


The upper mouth of the stomach is called the pen-men and lies right in the middle of the upper part of this organ ; the zen-men lies also at the upper part of the stomach but on the right side. An inch to the left of the yen-men is the chin-men ; inside the stomach to the left of the chin-men is a tubercle called the cho-shih ; on the outside of the stomach on the left of the chin-men is the tsung-ti and the liver is attached to it above. The stomach lies in the abdomen, lying quite flat in the lung direction ; the upper mouth is directed to the back, the lower mouth to the right; its base is directed to the abdomen and is connected with the outgoing water road.
[Wang Qingren (1768-1831), Yi Lin Gai Cuo (Correction des erreurs médicales, 1830), traduction John Dudgeon (1893)].


L’estomac. Zhen Jiu Da Cheng (édition de 1843) [Auteroche B, 1983].

Les théories médicales des chinois.  Jeanselme E. La Presse Médicale. 1900;76:179-182.
Estomac.

Estomac.
Andreas Cleyer (1612-1690).
Cleyer A. Specimen medicinae sinicae sive. Francfort sur le Main : Zubrodt, 1682.