GUASHA


 

 

Marteaux à massages (Matignon, 1886)
 


 
Vidéo :
acupuncture Neck gua sha
Mechanisms of guasha therapy by zhang xiuqin
kerokan
Guasa Health Specialist Course刮痧保健师课程


Références

2- gera: 104049/di/ra
GUA SHA AS COUNTERACTION: THE CRISIS IS THE CURE . NIELSEN A. journal of chinese medicine. 1996;50:5 (eng).
 
3- gera: 76672/di/ra
[GUASHA (SAND SCRAPING) THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF 24 CASES WITH OBSTINATE INSOMNIA]. JIA YINGLI ET AL. journal of clinical acupuncture and moxibustion. 2000;16(3):39 (chi).
 
4- gera: 71642/di/ra
[RECENT DEVELOPMENT OF SURGICAL DISEASE TREATED BY THE « GUA SHA » THERAPY]. ZHANG JIE ET AL. chinese journal of ethnomedicine and ethnopharmacy. 2000;43:71 (chi).
 
5- gera: 104779/di/ra
[THE GUASHA TREATMENT, NO AND YES]. ZENG YULIN. chinese journal of ethnomedicine and ethnopharmacy. 2002;6(3):125 (chi).
 
6- gera: 152008/di/ra
GUA SHA-GENTLY SCRAPING OUT THE SHA. BENTLEY B. lantern. 2007;4(2):4 (eng).
 
7- gera: 148020/di/ra
TREATMENT OF INSOMNIA WITH GUASHA (SCRAPING). LI XIANG-SHOO, ET AL. journal of acupuncture and tuina science. 2007;5(6):368 (eng).
Guasha(scraping) therapy falls into the category of « non-medication therapy ». It works well for insonmia in clinical
 
8- gera: 148182/nd/ra
THE EFFECT OF GUA SHA TREATMENT ON THE MICROCIRCULATION OF SURFACE TISSUE: A PILOT STUDY IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS. NIELSEN A, KNOBLAUCH NT, DOBOS GJ, MICHALSEN A, KAPTCHUK TJ. explore (ny). 2007;3(5):456-66 (eng).
CONTEXT: Gua Sha, therapeutic surface frictioning that intentionally raises transitory petechiae and ecchymosis, is a traditional East Asian healing technique also known as cao gio, coining, scraping, and spooning. There are case reports in Western literature but no studies on the physiological effects of Gua Sha. OBJECTIVE: To study themicrocirculatory effects of Gua Sha on the skin and subcutis in humans to elucidate physiological mechanisms responsible for the clinically observed pain-relieving effect of this treatment DESIGN: Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) was used to make sequential measurements of the microcirculation of surface tissue before and after Gua Sha treatment in 11 healthy subjects. The effect of Gua Sha treatment on the microcirculation of surface tissue was expressed as changes from baseline in arbitrary perfusion units (PU). SETTING: The study was conducted at the Department of Nephrology, Unit of Circulation Research, University Hospital of Essen, Germany. SUBJECTS: Subjects were volunteers from the nursing and physician staff of the Kliniken Essen. INTERVENTION: A single GuaSha treatment was applied to an area of each subject’s back. OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in microcirculationwas measured in PUs. Change in myalgia was subjectively reported and confirmed by manual palpation. RESULTS: Gua Sha caused a fourfold increase in microcirculation PUs at the treated area for the first 7. 5 minutes following treatment and a significant increase in surface microcirculation during the entire 25 minutes of the study period following treatment (P < . 001). Females showed significantly higher rates of response than males (P = . 003). Each subject experienced immediate decrease in myalgia in both the site treated, in the related distal control site, and in some cases, other distal sites. Pain relief persisted to some extent up to the follow-up visit. There were no adverse reactions. CONCLUSION: Gua Sha increases microcirculation local to a treated area, and that increase in circulation may play a role in local and distal decrease in myalgia. Decrease in myalgia at sites distal to a treated area is not due to distal increase in microcirculation. There is an unidentified pain-relieving biomechanism.
 
9- gera: 146163/di/ra
EFFECTIVENESS OF GUA SHA IN CHRONIC NECK PAIN: RESULTS OF A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL. SCHWICKERT M, BRAUN M, LÜDTKE R, MICHALSEN A, MUSIAL F, DOBOS G. research in complementary medicine. 2007;14(S1): (deu).
Aims: Gua Sha, therapeutic surface frictioning that intentionally raise. petechiae, is a traditional East Asian healing technique. We aimed tc examine whether a single Gua Sha treatment can reduce pain and im prove function in patients with chronic neck pain more than a commoi control treatment. Methods: Patients (age 19-70) with chronic necl pain and an initial VAS pain score >3 cm were eligible. Major exclusiot criteria were skin diseases, hemophilic disorders, invasive treatment o the cervical spine or pertinent soft tissue, rheumatic diseases, or treat ment with anticoagulants. Patients were randomised into verum o control group and followed up for 7 days. 24 verum patients wen treated with a single Gua Sha massage in the region of upper back/neck 24 control patients were treated with a single local application of ginger heat pad. The primary outcome measure was pain one week after treatment, assessed with VAS. Secondary outcomes were pain related tc movement, pain at other time points, scores on the neck disability index (NDI) and the SF-36. Results: The primary outcome measure showed statistically significant difference in VAS score in favour of GuaShi (group difference -22. 9 cm, 95%-CI: –43. 3 to -16. 6 cm, p=0. 0003 multiple ANCOVA) between the 2 study groups. From the secondary outcome measures, the NDI-score and the physical function and genera health items of the SF-36 showed statistically significant differences it favour of Gua Sha. Conclusions: Gua Sha seems to have a beneficia short term effect on pain and functional status in patients with chronic neck pain. Acknowledgements: The study was funded by the Karlam Veronica Carstens Foundation, Essen, Germany.
 
10- gera: 147610/di/ra
GUA SHA FOR MIGRAINE IN INPATIENT WITHDRAWAL THERAPY OF HEADACHE DUE TO MEDICATION OVERUSE. SCHWICKERT ME, SAHA EJ, BRAUN M, DOBOS GJ. forschende komplemetarmedizin. 2007;14(5):297 (deu).
Gua Sha for Migraine in Inpatient Withdrawal Therapy of Headache due to Medication OveruseGua Sha is a therapeutic method of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) widely used in Asia, particulary in the treatment of chronic pain. By use of the surface-frictioning technique (called ‘Gua’) petechiae and a skin rash similar to millet-seed (called ‘Sha’) are induced. As first observations on the application of that method have been promising, we present the case of a 72-year-old woman. The patient who suffered from chronic headaches, highly profited from Gua Sha during her 14-day inpatient multimodal treatment. This case provides first evidence that Gua Sha is effective in the treatment of headaches. Further research and clinical trials are required to corroborate
 
11- gera: 148814/nd/ra
[AN EXPERIENCE APPLYING GUA-SHA TO HELP A PARTURIENT WOMEN WITH BREAST FULLNESS]. CHIU CY, CHANG CY, GAU ML. hu li za zhi. 2008;55(1):105-10 (eng).
This paper was designed to describe the experience of nurses who applied Gua-Sha, a traditional Asian healing technique, in caring for a parturient woman suffering from breast fullness. The caring period ran from the second day postpartum through the mother’s discharge from the hospital, and included telephone follow up during the firstand second postpartum weeks. Main caring activities included: (1) supporting and reinforcing the mother’s confidence to encourage continued breastfeeding; (2) making sure the baby suckled in a good position and that the mother mastered proper breastfeeding techniques; (3) applying Gua-Sha to help breast milk expression and reduce the breast fullness discomfort; and (4) following up regularly on breastfeeding and breast fullness conditions. As a result, the mother was able to continue breastfeeding and could eventually take care of herself,
 
12- gera: 151296/di/ra
GUA SHA RESEARCH AND THE LANGUAGE OF INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE. NIELSEN A. . acupuncture. 2009;13(1):63-72 (eng).
This article is based on research findings published by Nielsen et al. [2007a. The effect of ‘Gua sha’ treatment on the microcirculation of surface tissue: a pilot study in healthy subjects. EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing 3, 456-466]. The abstract was accepted for poster session at the conference on fascia (www. fascia2007. com) and appears in the conference text Fascia Research [Nielsen, A. , Knoblauch, N. , Dobos, G. , Michalsen, A. , Kaptchuk, T. , 2007b. The effect of ‘Gua sha’ treatment on the microcirculation of surface tissue: a pilot study in healthy subjects. In: Findley, T. W. , Schleip, R. (Eds. ), Fascia Research: Basic Science and Implications for Conventional and Complementary Health Care. Elsevier, Munich, Germany, pp. 249-250]. Our Gua sha perfusion study, the abstract of which is reprinted in Box 1, was the first investigation into the physiology ofGua sha, a technique of traditional East Asian medicine used to treat conditions that have features of blood stasis,pain, and/or inflammation. Issues raised by our study are discussed here such as the significance of the terms used in Western medical literature to describe traditional indigenous therapies like Gua sha and the implication of our findings not only for future research but toward a shift in how the integrative medical community signifies its work.