Cheng Danan (1898-1957)

1214 vues 30/11/2009

Cheng Danan (1898-1957)

Cheng Danan (1898-1957)

Cheng Danan (1898-1957)
« In the early 1930s, Cheng Danan, a Chinese scholar-physician, used Euroamerican anatomy to rehabilitate acupuncture as a respectable skill. In Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion Therapeutics, Cheng (1932) insisted that acupuncture must be an effective medical therapy, because its mechanism of action was the stimulation of the nerves described in European medical theory. Cheng insisted that the acupuncture points be redefined in light of this insight; in his book, he repositioned them away from blood vessels (where previously they might have been used for bloodletting) and toward the nerve pathways. He illustrated his revisions by painting the new acupuncture pathways onto the skin of volunteers and then photographing them, a technique that gave his book a greater air of modernity and reflected the increasingly common use of photographic illustrations in European medical books of the time. Cheng’s new scientific acupuncture was a great success in China. His book went through many editions from 1930 to 1960, and he set up his own college of acupuncture. Cheng achieved such prominence in the Chinese medical community that after the Communist takeover in 1949, he was asked to serve on several national committees in charge of medical policy and education. Chengs work helped acupuncture regain sufficient credibility to be reincorporated into the teaching and practice of the new Chinese medicine. In the 1950s, however, Cheng abandoned his own earlier insistence that acupuncture must work through the nerves alone. Instead, he attributed its efficacy to the power of qi and the doctor-patient relationship, in addition to the physical stimulation of the nerves ».
Acupuncture and the Reinvention of Chinese MedicineAndrews BJ. APS Bulletin. 1999;9(3).